Shop Orvis Today!
Description: This week we continue our exploration of Trout in Trouble, specifically in Montana. Pat Byorth [52:56], Montana Fish Commissioner [52:56], and I discuss the current decline of brown trout in southwest Montana, what you should do if you fish there during this hot, low-water year, and what the future may hold. He'll give some good advice on being a responsible angler during this tough period.
Play Podcast
Description: My guest this week is Phil Rowley [55:20], author of the just-released book The Orvis Guide to Stillwater Trout Fishing and fellow host for The New Fly Fisher TV show. Phil is a stillwater genius and he helps us untangle the confusion around fly lines for fishing in lakes and ponds, and exactly which lines you need.
Play Podcast
Description: Overcrowding is an issue on many of our more popular trout streams, and there is no easy solution. This week I join journalist Spencer Durrant [@40:06] to discuss what he sees are solutions to some of the problems, both in finding alternate places to fish and also how to behave if you find yourself on a crowded river.
Play Podcast
Description: This week, we're continuing our series on winter fly fishing for trout. I interview Antonio Rodrigues [42:50] manager of Front Range Anglers in Boulder, Colorado, and he has a different take on winter fly fishing, and some different methods. I've found it fascinating to see how each guest approaches this differently and hope you pick up some tips as well.
Play Podcast
Description: Continuing our exploration of winter trout fishing techniques, this week my guest is angler and photographer Timbre Pringle [40:08]. You have likely seen photos of Timbre or ones taken by her and her husband Darcy in Orvis catalogs and ads, as well as many of the fly-fishing magazines. She doesn't exactly fish in the far north as she fishes in Alberta, in southern Canada, but for most Americans any place in Canada seems like the far north. Timbre gives her tips for fishing her local river, the Bow, in the winter, but she offers tips that will work during the winter in any trout stream.
Play Podcast
Description: I've begun a series on winter trout fishing podcasts with various experts around the country. I think it will be interesting to see how their approaches compare, what flies and leaders they use, and how they keep their hands and feet warm. This week's guest is Tim Johnson, who you probably know more as an artist on Instagram or on the Orvis Artist Collab series of H3 rods. Tim is also a longtime guide and experienced angler and has spent many winter days on his home waters in Utah. He's also one of the best storytellers I know so I think you'll enjoy the interview.
Play Podcast
Description: This week, my guest is Sav Sankaran [47:28], fishing manager at the Orvis store in Asheville. The subject is Late Fall and Winter trout fishing in the Southeast, and although Sav talks about his rivers specifically, there are many good tips for winter fishing anywhere in the world. You may have enjoyed Sav's bluegrass music on a recent Orvis Facebook Live event, and he's also the subject of an Orvis story on his special family holiday gatherings https://www.orvis.com/dinner-music.
Play Podcast
Description: Many fly fishers have dreaded the thought of visiting their favorite trout streams after wildfires devasted many areas over the past few years. As threatening as they are to human lives and property, wildfires are not all that bad for trout stream ecosystems, as you'll discover after listening to this week's podcast. Becky Flitcroft [interview at 39:03], a fisheries biologist with the US Forest Service and an expert on disturbances to trout streams, presents some surprising results in the wake of fires. Not only are they not horribly destructive, they are actually beneficial in many cases. Should you visit a trout stream that was in a burned area next year? What will the future look like? Although every stream is different, Becky tells us what to expect over the coming years.
Play Podcast
Description: This week, the podcast is about native trout, specifically the Rio Grande cutthroat of New Mexico. It's the story of two communities, one a small New Mexico town and the other the Taos Pueblo tribe, told by Toner Mitchell of Trout Unlimited, and Talisa Puentes Ortega, a biologist who worked on the project with the Taos Pueblo.
Play Podcast
Description: This week I have the pleasure of interviewing perhaps the nicest human being on the planet, Tim Linehan of Linehan Outfitters in Libby, Montana. I think you'll get a sense of what kind of person he is by listening in. We talk about how the recent pandemic has affected fishing guides and lodges, but on a more fun note, Tim describes his fishery in northern Montana--the only place in Montana where you can catch a true native rainbow trout (rainbows on famous rivers like the Madison, Bighorn, Missouri, and Gallatin were originally stocked).
Play Podcast
Description: This week I have another podcast with John McMillan, as I have to confess I love talking to John about fishy stuff. His knowledge and enthusiasm and passion are infectious and I think his interviews are always enlightening. This week we talk about The Colors of Trout—can we tell anything from the coloration of trout about their life history? Is there a good way to tell a hatchery form a wild fish? What does it mean when trout carry parr marks into adulthood? How quickly can trout change their coloration? And are the spot patterns on trout like fingerprints? Warning—we come up with more questions than answers and you may as well.
Play Podcast
Description: In today's podcast my guest is Shawn Combs, head of Orvis Rod & Tackle product development and Orvis rod and reel designer. The topic is "16 Things I Wish I Knew About Trout Spey Before I Started". If you have been thinking about trying to swing wet flies or small streamers for trout with a two-handed rod, also known as "Micro Spey", this will be a valuable lesson for you. These are light two-handed rods, in line sizes 3 and 4, designed for covering larger waters. It's especially effective in the fall, when trout are getting aggressive as the move into winter and brown and brook trout are migrating to their spawning grounds. It's a fun and for many of us a new way to fish for trout.
Play Podcast
Description: This week my guest is noted steelhead angler and scientist John McMillen of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. John’s topic is The Secret Life of Steelhead, and his fascinating discussion of why they do what they do (and the challenges they face) held me in absolute fascination. I am sure you’ll feel the same. Besides being a lifelong steelhead angler (John was a tester on our new Mission Series of two-handed rods), john has spent hundreds of days snorkeling steelhead rivers observing them, and at one time he was fishing about 345 days a year. John has worked professionally for the US Forest Service, the Hoh Indian Tribe, the Wild Salmon Center, and recently for NOAA on the Elwha dam removal project. Despite his lifetime of studying the life history and ecology of steelhead, John remains an optimist on the future of steelhead and it gives us hope that someone who understands them so well feels they have a chance of survival. In the Fly Box this week, we have these questions and suggestions from listeners: How to clean waders with vodka! A tip on a simple tool for tying nail knots A suggestion for a quick change rig for catching barracuda when fishing for bonefish and permit Why am I having trouble hooking brown trout on terrestrials? What waders do you recommend for someone starting out? What safety precautions do you take on the water? When you first get to the river, how do you decide which nymphing technique to use? What regular fly line size works on the Practicaster? Is there a good way to mark large smallmouth bass so I can see if I am catching the same ones? Silver saltwater hooks don’t work well for me when I fish Clousers in salt water. Why? I have a box of old leaders that are between five and 20 years old. Should I use them? Can I fish for steelhead in Lake Ontario tributaries with a 9-foot 8-weight rod? Why do I see so many scarred fish in a particular river? What other presentations should I use in high, dirty water when streamers don’t work?
Play Podcast
Description: Secrets of catching sipping trout with Dave Perkins This week I interview Dave Perkins, Orvis Vice Chairman and one of the best technical anglers I know. Dave loves geeky challenges and is an expert at catching those picky large trout that lay up against the banks and sip small flies—ones that most anglers don’t even notice. In the Fly Box this week we have the following questions: Can I use a Bimini Twist knot to attach my leader to my fly line? Why does a trout that is sipping quietly suddenly attack my dry fly? Is there a way to land large trout in a small stream without a net? A tip on using split ring pliers for removing split shot. How do you choose where to go fishing when there are so many options? What books did you use when starting out, and where do you get your information these days? How do I avoid foul hooking fish when dry dropper fishing with a nymph on a short dropper Which is better, a fiberglass or bamboo rod? Is there a way to connect a tarpon or cuda fly directly to my bonefish fly? I have heard it can be done with a loop. How do I know how fast to set the hook on rising trout? Is it ethical to target bass on spawning beds?
Play Podcast
Description: This week’s podcast is one of the biggest eye-openers I have ever done. Not only did I learn a lot, I have actually changed my views on a number of topics, including the effects of the moon on fishing and the effects of a change in barometric pressure. My guest, Russ Carpenter, is a neurologist at Stanford who studies the brains and senses of fish, specifically rainbow trout. He answers lots of question about a trout’s sense of smell, vision, and hearing. Including UV vision. I hope you learn as much as I did in this podcast. In the Fly Box this week, we have these questions: Do you really fish with bamboo rods? Aren’t graphite and glass better? Why did I see large steelhead in a Great Lakes tributary in July? What is your opinion on stocking fish in wild trout streams? Is a 6-weight line from 30 years ago the same size as a modern 6-weight?Can I dye a fly line with RIT dye? What is the best saltwater weed guard? Are some spooky fish truly un-catchable? Is there anything I can do to try to catch them? Is there a difference between a Scottish brown trout and a German brown? I am landing trout up to 20 inches without letting them run. Am I doing something wrong? What do you think about weighted soft hackles? With modern runner soles like the Michelin sole on the Pro Boot, is there any need for studs?
Play Podcast
«StartPrevious1234NextEnd»